Chinese food

Stir fry egg with garlic chive

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Egg and garlic chive is a common home-cooked meal in Southern China. It is quick and easy to cook, nutritious, and comforting.

Egg and garlic chive

The easy 10-minute cooking involves:

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Meals for homeless – poached chicken with oyster sauce (FODMAP friendly)

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This is a simple and delicious meal with whole chicken(s) and a few other ingredients –  oyster sauce, sesame oil, ginger, shallot and corn flour.  For a FODMAP friendly recipe, use only green part of the shallot.

Meal for homeless - slow poached chicken with oyster sauce and green shallot (FODMAP friendly)

Here are the easy steps:

Stir fried tofu skin 腐竹 with Chinese mushroom 香菇 and capsicum (gluten free, vegan)

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My favorite Northern Chinese restaurant makes this lovely tofu skin dish, with Sichuan pepper infused oil and loads of garlic.  I tried to replicate it a few times but without success.

So here is my own version. It is actually tastier than the one in the restaurant (grins) !

Stir fried tofu skin 腐竹 with Chinese mushroom 香菇 and capsicum (gluten free, vegan)

Recipe is as follows:

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Home style pork spare ribs with soy sauce, wine and vinegar (FODMAP friendly, gluten free option)

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Pork spare ribs are inexpensive in Sydney, a fraction of the cost of pork ribs.  It is one of the most popular cuts of pork for Asian food, lovely when slow cooked in a rich salty, sweet and sour sauce.

Here is our dinner tonight – pork spare ribs braised in a soy sauce, red wine,sesame oil  and vinegar, with a hint of ginger and cumin.

Home style pork spare ribs with soy sauce, wine and vinegar (FODMAP friendly, gluten free option)

Recipe is as follows:

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Homemade wheat noodles in soup, memories of a peasant family at a noodle shop

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Homemade wheat noodles in soup, memories of a peasant family at a noodle shop

A few evenings ago, I watched Behind the News with my 9 year old boy on ABC iview. Behind the News is a TV news program made for the kids. That evening, the program covered the famine situation in Sudan.  “Had China ever have famine?”my little boy asked. These few innocent words had brought back my memories of a peasant family begging at a cheap noodle restaurant. I could still see their shadows, even today.

In early 70’s, my grandmother cooked communal dinners for the extended families. Each family contributed to the cost of the food. Money and resources were limited at the time. We nearly never went out for dinners, as my mother didn’t want to pay for meals twice. One night, for whatever reasons we were at this cheap noodle restaurant. It was a common and shabby place. The kitchen inside was steamy with a large pot of hot water for cooking the noodles, a large pot of cold water to cool and rinse the noodles, and a large pot of soup with nothing in it and barely any color. We found a table outside with wobbly chairs and started to eat our noodle soups. For a few cents, the meal had no meat or vegetables, just plain noodles and a little green shallot floating on top. It was hot and a rare treat for a little 5-year old girl.

Suddenly, 3 children in ragged clothes surrounded our table. They looked different to our city people. They had dark and coarse skin, as they were farmers from the countryside. They were dirty and messy, as they were far away from home and living on streets. They spoke in dialect that I never heard before. They would have traveled from afar, probably from another province where their crops failed. And their eyes, they had such hungry eyes. The littlest one just devoured some leftover soup from the next table, and redirected his attention to my bowl.

I looked up to my mother. ‘Eat up all your food’, she said sternly. When I left some food in the bowl at the end of the meal, she picked up the bowl and swallowed everything in it, including last drops of the soup, the soup of nothingness. The children moved away to another table, motionless.

Peasant family
A peasant family

Many years past, my memories of that family did not fake. Most of all, I was puzzled why my mother was so indifferent to the begging children.  After all, she was an orphan herself. She would have understood the pain and suffering of that family, hungry, homeless and desperate?

This weekend, I made a large batch of noodles from scratch. I served the noodles in a beautiful chicken soup, topped with mouthwatering crispy bacon bits. Life has been kind to our family and we really appreciate what we have.

Like to have a go at making your own noodles?  Recipe is as follows.

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Hairy gourd ‘liangban’ salad with XO sauce 节瓜凉拌

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This week I discovered an Asian grocery store 10 minutes’ drive away. Their stock range was quite comprehensive. The man in the shop helped me with the bags to my car which was sort of services I never experienced from an Asian store. I managed to find a parking spot very close to the shop – can’t believe my luck. I was very impressed.

I picked up a beautifully fresh hairy gourd from the shop. Hairy gourd is a very popular vegetable in Southern China, easy to grow with plenty of subtropical rains. The gourd is normally cooked in a soup or a stew with a tender and soft texture.

Today I decided to do something different with a ‘liangban’ 凉拌 salad. I added XO sauce to the salad for a kick as the gourd, on its own, could be quite plain. XO sauce is a mildly spicy paste made with dried seafood, garlic and chili, packed of flavors.

 

Hairy gourd 'liangban' salad with XO sauce  节瓜凉拌

I first peeled the skin of the gourd; I then julienned the flesh, disregard the seedy part of the gourd (but reversed for a soup dish). I then briefly blanched the vegetable until it was just cooked (about 1-2 minute) and ran it under cold water to cool; I mixed the drained vegetable with sesame oil, XO sauce, a generous dash of dark soy sauce, white pepper, chili, sesame seeds and sliced green shallot. I left the salad in fridge to chill for couple of hours before serving.  So simple and delicious. No recipe required.

Golden pork dumplings 豬肉餃子

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My little boy’s school has a school fete shortly and I am running an Asian food stall for the school.

Last Sunday we had a few school families and friends over to wrap dumplings for the Asian food stall. We used up 16kg of pork mince, 6 large bunch of garlic chive, 3 large wom bok cabbages. At the end of the day we made 1,100 ‘jiaozi’ dumplings and 120 ‘siu mai’ dim sims.

In between wrapping the dumplings, we enjoyed a few bottles of sparkling wines, smoked spicy beef ribs, Vietnamese pork kebabs, some giggles and chats. We also tested our fruit of labor – pan fried dumplings (picture below).

Golden pork dumplings 豬肉餃子

I have learned a few new tricks for making dumplings. Our friend Michelle had kindly came over to help out and she was an expert in preparing the dumping filling.  She soaked some Sichuan red pepper corns with hot water and added the water to the filling, this will give the meat extra favors. She also stirred the mince with chopsticks one circular direction which will smooth the meat.  When she pan fried the dumplings, she added some plain flour mixed with a little water, which formed a lovely web-like base that tasted absolutely delicious.

We also added sesame oil, mirin, soys sauce to the dumpling filling. We used shop bought dumpling wrappers as 1,100 wrappers were too many to be hand made.

Making dumplings for the school fete
Making dumplings for the school fete

Looking forward to sell these lovely dumplings at the fete and raise some money for our school.

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Lemongrass pork scotch fillets (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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We have a bush of lemongrass in the garden. Each harvest we were reward a large bag of juicy stalks. So today I made some grilled pork with lemongrass, ginger, kaffir lime leafs, fish sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil.

There are still so much lemongrass left!

Lemongrass pork scotch fillets (low FODMAP, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow:

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Braised beef tendon with Asian spices (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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Winter is finally here in Sydney and I am craving for something rich and hopefully it would make my skin glow again. Beef tendon is pack with collagen, low fat and no cholesterol… not 100% sure about the skin care benefits, but I am cooking a bowl for the OMG deliciousness.

Braised beef tendon with Asian spices (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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BBQ baby octopus in Asian marinate (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

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It was Queens birthday long weekend. I decided to cook a few dishes that would take some time to prepare.

The local seafood shop had some nice baby octopus so I picked up a few handfuls. I first dropped the octopus and some ginger in boiling water for a minute or two; then transferred them to a bowl of ice water; I marinated the octopus with fish sauce, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, lemon juice, kumquat juice, sliced kaffir lime leafs, chili, marmalade and sesame oil; I placed the octopus in the fridge to marinate overnight, then BBQ them on a hot griddle. So juicy and tender!

BBQ baby octopus in Asian marinate (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

 

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Simple chicken stir fry with vegetable, egg and peanuts (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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On Fridays I work from home so I can drop my little boy off at school and pick him up. I am often swamped with work and I have something really quick for lunch at home (like a bowl of instant noodles cooked in the microwave). This week I was in luck with some free time – so I decided to cook a simple stir fry for lunch.

Simple chicken stir fry with vegetable, egg and peanuts (low FODMAP, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow:

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Sesame and peanut slice

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Earlier today I made some  sweet glutinous rice balls and had some peanut, sesame & coconut coating left, so I made this simple & delicious sweet snack, sometimes found at the street market stalls around Asian.

Sesame and peanut slice

Recipe is as follow:

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Sweet glutinous rice balls with walnut, sesame, peanut & coconut

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These sumptuous sweet rice balls are such a treat – often served at special occasions such as the Chinese Luna New Years or the Moon Festivals. The balls are sweet, nutty and slightly chewy, so very delicious.

Sweet glutinous rice balls with walnut, sesame, peanut & coconut

Recipe is as follow:

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Asian style omelette with cabbage and oyster sauce (low FODMAP)

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I lived in Melbourne some years ago for work, far away from friends and family. One of my favorite pass time was going to Daimaru Japanese department store. At the lower ground floor of the store there were fast food outlets. There was this particular one that sold Japanese cabbage omelettes and I was really fond of it. The omelettes were served with  a thick oyster sauce and mayonnaise.

Here is a tummy friendly version of a cabbage omelette – served with a lighter sauce.

Asian style omelette with cabbage and oyster sauce (low FODMAP)

 

Recipe is as follow:

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Sticky rice with Chinese sausage and mushroom

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When I was a little girl, sticky rice was such a treat – we would only enjoy it on special occasions such as weddings or festival seasons. It is probably because it takes extra efforts to fry glutinous rice ?

Sticky rice with Chinese sausage and mushroom

Recipe is as follows:

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Pan fried fish with chili tomato sauce (FODMAP Friendly)

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Many years ago I cooked for a elderly relative while  his family was away on holiday. I found an inexpensive fish in his freezer and made him a pan fried fish with chili tomato sauce. He loved it a great deal and gave me many praises. It was one of those moments that I suddenly discovered that I could cook !

Here is a FODMAP friendly version – I used a whole bream today but you can use any fish that is not too thick or too large. You can also use fish fillets if you are not a fan of fish bones. But the recipe tastes really nice with a whole fish.

Pan fried fish with chili and tomato sauce, FODMAP friendly

 

Recipe is as follows:

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Egg and ginger soup – Grandmother’s cough remedy (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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Winter is approaching and there are a few flu and coughs going around in Sydney. Instead of using the good old cough syrups, why not try a Chinese remedy that works on the core of the illness?

My grandmother used to make me this egg and ginger soup when I had ‘cool’ coughs – referred to as dry coughs at night when the air is chill. A few bowls of this soup over a few days work like magic.

Egg and ginger soup - Grandmother's cough remedy

 

Recipe is as follow:  Read the rest of this entry »

10-minute chicken & seaweed soup (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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This is probably the quickest, nutritious, and the most delicious soup I could cook in 10 minutes.  The whole family loves it especially my little boy who is a picky eater.

Chicken & seaweed soup (low FODMAP, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow:

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Scrambled eggs with garlic chive and prawns (gluten free)

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Have you ever been to a suburban Chinese restaurant that serves a prawn omelette that is dry and uninteresting? Try this simple, tasty and moist scramble eggs with garlic chive and prawns and I bet you will never look back.

Scrambled eggs with garlic chive and prawns (gluten free)
Scrambled eggs with garlic chive and prawns (gluten free)

Recipe is as follows:  Read the rest of this entry »

Brown rice congee with salted pork & peanuts (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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For a Chinese southerner, what food can be more warm and comforting than a hot bowl of pork congee (粥)?  The humble congee is the sort of food kids get when they are sick.  It is also a popular street food and you will find it at ‘yum cha’. Coogee goes well with fried noodles, Chinese donuts and it is delicious by itself. You can eat it with the thick & bulky Chinese ceramic spoon, or raise the bowl to your lips and slurp it.

If you’d like to have a go at cooking your own congee, a pressure cooker is highly recommended, otherwise it takes hours.

Here is my lunch today, brown rice congee with salted pork and peanuts.

Brown rice congee with salted pork & peanuts (low FODMAP, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Celery salad with black fungus and peanuts (Liang Ban 涼拌) (vegan)

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Here is another cool Asian salad for a hot Sydney day – lightly blanched celery, cooked salted peanuts, crunchy black fungus and green bean vermicelli. Great for lunch, dinner, or as a side dish.

Celery salad with black fungus and peanuts (Liang Ban 涼拌) (vegan)

Recipe is as follows: Read the rest of this entry »

Chop suey with chicken and Chinese vegetables

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I was really keen to make some fun-guo dumplings this week for Chinese New Year.  When I finally got around to made the filling for the dumplings, I ran out of time to make the dough. We had this chop suey for dinner with some rice, it was really yummy.

Chop suey with chicken and Chinese vegetables

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Twice cooked chicken mini drumsticks

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These chicken mini drumsticks are gently cooked in a stock with with Chinese spices,  then pan fried with mushroom soy sauce. Finger licking good !

Twice cooked chicken mini drumsticks

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Home made steamed buns ‘man tou’ (馒头)

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This is a heart warming plain steamed bun that is soft and fluffy when served warm or at room temperature. Great for sandwiching spicy twice cooked pork, or any meaty dishes with strong flavors.

Home made steamed buns 'man tou' (馒头)

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Twice cooked pork with chili soy bean sauce (Hui Guo Rou 回锅肉)

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This twice cooked pork is aromatic, juicy and can be seriously spicy. My friends told me, as they walked down to my house for dinner, they could smell the cooking from the top of the street. This dish is so tasty and satisfying with a bowl of rice, or a few freshly steamed ‘Man Tou’ (plain steamed buns).

Twice cooked pork with chili soy bean sauce (Hui Guo Rou 回锅肉)

I have posted the ‘Man Tou’ recipe here.

Recipe is as follow:  Read the rest of this entry »

Chinese tea infused eggs (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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Eggs are precious to me.When I was a little girl, my family had very little. Every year at my birthday, instead of kids party, mouthwatering sweets, toys and other gifts, I received a hard boil egg that was colored in red. The red color was rubbed off, with a little water, from some left over cheap red paper that was used for wrapping the ‘lucky’ money for Chinese Luna New Years.

Having lived in Australia for nearly 30 years, I still love my eggs immensely.I use eggs for cooking all the time, sometimes it is as simple as cracking an egg over some boiled rice and cook it in microwave for 1 minute as a quick meal, eat with a dash of soy sauce and olive oil.

The soy sauce and tea infused eggs below is a popular street snack food across Asia. My version is FODMAP friendly and can be made as a gluten free option.

Chinese tea infused eggs (low FODMAP, gluten free)

It is very simple to make – see recipe below. Read the rest of this entry »

Asian spiced chicken drumsticks (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

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Growing up in Southern China, chicken drumsticks were the most desirable parts of a chicken. This is because the meat on the drumsticks is juicy and flavorsome, whereas chicken breast meat is thick and it is difficult to infuse flavors into the meat.

I love baking drumsticks in an oven bag –  just taste extra juicy and pack of flavors.

Here is my version of an Asian chicken drumstick recipe with soy, ginger, chills, coriander, turmeric, coconut milk, sesame oil and tomatoes.

Asian spiced chicken drumsticks (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow:

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Asian inspired egg pancake with vegetables (low FODMAP, gluten free)

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This is an easy pancake with egg, rice flour, zucchini, capsicum coconut milk and a dash of fish sauce. It is suitable for breakfast, lunch and dinner. It is also tummy friendly.

Asian inspired egg pancake with vegetables (low FODMAP, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow:

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Flaky shallot pancake (蔥油餅)

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I was chatting with Li, another school mum about a forthcoming international food festival at school.  I mentioned that I’d make some shallot cake, a traditional snack from Northern China.  There were twinkles in Li’s eyes. “For one of my birthdays,” Li said, “my mother made three pieces of those really tasty flaky shallot pancakes. I asked why there were only three pieces.  To make these pancakes for my birthday, mum used up every drop of cooking oil in the house. Those days, cooking oil was rationed in China.”

Yes, I remember ‘those days’.

An 250 gram cooking oil coupon
A 250 gram cooking oil coupon

That afternoon, I made my family a batch of shallot pancakes – flaky, oily, chewy and incredibly comforting!

Flaky shallot pancake (蔥油餅)

Recipe is as follows: Read the rest of this entry »

Poached chicken in Chinese rice wine (gluten free)

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If you like flavorsome, juicy & tender white cut chicken, you should try this recipe with Chinese rice wine. So simple and no recipe required.

Bring a pot of water to boil, drop in 1 inch of ginger (sliced), 2 inch of lemongrass (lightly bashed), 2 chicken breast fillets (whole) and season with salt; bring the water back to gentle boil; turn off the heat and leave the pot on the stove (not turn on) for 25 minutes or so; Check the chicken, this should be just cooked after 25 minutes; Slice the chicken into strips and pour over Chinese rice wine that is just enough to cover the chicken pieces;  drizzle with some sesame oil and a small dash of soy (optional); leave the dish aside  in room temperature for a while (30 minutes) for the flavor to develop; Serve at room temperature or chilled;  Garnish with chopped shallot that’s been quickly pan fried in some hot oil then dusted with some sea salt.

Poached chicken in Chinese rice wine (gluten free)
Poached chicken in Chinese rice wine (gluten free)

Steamed oysters with soy sauce, sesame oil, shallot, coriander and chilies

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My hubby & I always debate about natural oysters vs. cooked oysters. I love my oysters lightly steamed (30 seconds to 1 minute on hot steam), topped with sliced shallot^, coriander, chilies, white wine, soy sauce* and sesame oil;  then finish with a hot splash of cooking oil on top of the herbs to bring out the flavors & freshness. It is so simple and delicious, no recipe required.

* use gluten free soy sauce for an gluten free option.

 

Steamed oysters with soy sauce, sesame oil, shallot, coriander and chilies

Traditional Chinese watercress and bone broth 西洋菜汤 (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

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Something was always plenty in Southern China where I grew up – rain, rain and rain. And not surprisingly, watercress was always fresh and cheap. My grandmother loved to cook watercress broth – she boiled the vegetables for hours with lots of pork bones.

Here is my version of a refreshing watercress broth – no recipe required.

1-1.5kg of pork bones, a quick boil to clean them up; then put the bones in a pressure cooker with the stems of a bundle of the watercress (need to be washed thoroughly, reserve the green tops), 1-2 cut-up carrots and 2 dried dates (skip the dates for a FODMAP friendly option). If you like, a few pieces of dried lotus root (skip for a FODMAP friendly option) –  cook for 15-20 minutes on high pressure – and the broth is done. Season with some salt and pepper.

For the other half of the watercress – the nice green tops, boil the watercress quickly in hot water (approx 1 minute); serve with the broth.

If you like to be an old fashion Chinese for once – chew the meat off bones, it is delicious.

Traditional Chinese watercress and bone broth 西洋菜汤 (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

Soy braised pork belly with bamboo shoots (gluten free)

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For Chinese cooking, pork belly is arguably one of the most popular cut of pork – it is juicy, full of flavor and mouthwatering fatty. It can be stir fried, steamed, boiled, braised, preserved/dried & roast. This pork belly dish was originated from a traditional dish called  ‘red braised pork’. It so happened that I have a jar of spicy bamboo shoots in the pantry. Bamboo shoots go so well with pork and  I added a few table spoonfuls to the pork belly.

Soy braised pork belly with bamboo shoots (gluten free)

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Green beans and eggs, with oyster sauce (low FODMAP)

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When I was a child, this was a popular dish at our house  – grandmother raised a coup of egg-laying chickens at the roof top terrace, and green beans from the market were always fresh and cheap. The soft eggs compliments the crunchiness of bean; the oyster sauce enhances the freshness of the beans & eggs. So simple, quick & tasty – goes really well with a small bowl of hot rice.

Green beans and eggs, with oyster sauce (low FODMAP)

 

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Banana chilies stuffed with lamb, topped with an Asian sauce of oyster, soy and sesame oil (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

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I saw some beautiful banana chilies in the local fruit shop & can’t help thinking of this dish –  a popular dish in Southern China with freshwater fish as stuffing. I like to use lamb & cabbage, it goes so well with chilies.

Banana chilies stuffed with lamb, topped with an Asian sauce of oyster, soy and sesame oil (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow:  Read the rest of this entry »

Pork and bok choy dumplings with home made rice and tapioca wrappings (FODMAP friendly, gluten free)

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Our friend Bill has gut problems and is on a low FODMAP diet. He posted on facebook today, saying “I am sick of being sad; and sad for being sick”.  To lift his spirit, we invited Bill over for some food.

I made some steamed rice flour and tapioca dumplings with pork and bokchoy.

Pork and bok choy dumplings with home made rice and tapioca wrappings (fodmap friendly, gluten free)

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Pork belly with Chinese dry mustard greens (Mei Cai Kou Rou 梅菜扣肉)

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Pork belly with Chinese dry mustard greens (Mei Cai Kou Rou 梅菜扣肉)

When I was a little girl, my grandmother often sent me to the market across the road to get groceries. At the market, there were urns of soy sauce, slabs of tofu, loads of vegetables, a fish stand and a pork stand.  When it was my turn at the butcher’s stand, with his huge chopping cleaver in his hand, he looked down to me and asked loudly: ‘soup or for stir fry’. I looked up and quietly said: “kou rou’. He would then cut me a small piece of pork belly and tight it with a bamboo string as I handed over coupons and money.

A Chinese butcher at the market
A Chinese butcher at the market

I still remember how the bundles of dry ‘Mei Cai’, or salted Chinese dry mustard greens, hanging from the bamboo racks at the markets. There were preserved greens as well, being fermented in large brown urns. In the good old days, ‘mei cai’ was popular in China – it was cheap and can be use with so many dishes. If one ran out of money, ‘mei cai’ and boiled rice was considered a far superior option than soy sauce and boiled rice.

Here is one of my grandmother’s favorite dish – ‘mei cai kou rou’, or pork belly with Chinese dry mustard greens.

Recipe is as follows:  Read the rest of this entry »

Mapo tofu (麻婆豆腐), and my father’s story of two spoonful of oil

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Mapo tofu (麻婆豆腐), and my father's story of two spoonful of oil

The province of Sichuan in China is famous for its taste bud killing pepper corn & spicy food.  One of their most famous dishes is the ‘mapo tofu’, sometimes translated as the ‘pockmarked grandma’s bean curd’.

When my father was a young lad, he attended a university far away from home. Ever since then, he developed a strong desire for traveling. After graduation, he worked for a state-owned factory with a starting salary of 51 yuan a month. He did not have the money to travel other than travelling for work.

One year, he was fortunate enough to be sent to Sichuan for a research project. He asked my grandmother for an oil coupon.  Those days most essentials were scarce and required coupons. When he arrived, he took the coupon to a well-known local restaurant and ordered a big bowl of mapo tofu. ‘The tofu was so good,’ he said to me, still with great enthusiasm, ‘ it had two spoonfuls of oil in it.”

A young traveler, somewhere in the Nortern China
A young traveler, somewhere in the Northern China

I have had many mapo tofu dishes over the years – they all seemed to be overly oily. But I liked them just like that  – I soaked up the oil with boiled rice. I could feel  my father’s joy and excitement as a far-away-from-home young traveler.

Recipe is as follows:   Read the rest of this entry »

Chinese traditional steamed pork ‘cake’ 蒸肉餅 (gluten free)

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My old aunt & my cousin are coming over for lunch today.  My aunt can’t cook much any more, so I am cooking them a traditional Chinese meal.  No other meat could be more traditional than pork. I remembered that my old aunt had a secret for all good Chinese pork dishes – ginger, shallot, soy & wine.

Chinese traditional steamed pork 'cake' 蒸肉餅 (gluten free)

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »

Hot and sour soup 酸辣湯

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When I first arrived in Australia in late 1980s, I studied full time & worked part time in an upmarket Chinese restaurant serving northern style cuisines. I was always amazed by the beautiful aroma from the hot and sour soup and its interesting taste – hot but not overwhelming, sour with a woody base,  sweet and crunchy, offering so much comfort on a winter’s night.

Hot and sour soup 酸辣湯

Recipe is as follow: Read the rest of this entry »